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Art at the Park

Visiting Scholar: Rob Mulholland, Scotland

Sculpture Installation to Debut at RIVERFest, October 9

Scottish Environmental Artist to Install "One Flock," Promoting River Restorations

"One Flock" will be the first US installation by renowned Scottish sculptor, Rob Mulholland. This amazing series of pieces will be unveiled at Paradise Creek Nature Park on October 9 during Elizabeth River Project's RIVERFest. 

Thanks to the National Endowment for the Arts, Mulholland will visually represent the symbiotic relationship between humans and the natural world, conveying the message that humans and birds share one fate, through climate change and other ecological challenges. ​

The concept will include over one hundred bird shapes laser-cut from 3mm stainless steel, creating a free-flowing shape inspired by the natural instinct and social interaction of bird life. Four human figures will stand in unison with the wildlife as guardians of the park's Wetlands. The symbolism further reflects the social interface between people, races, and communities delivering a positive artistic and social statement for inclusion of all people and wildlife in our world. 

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Righting the Balance,” steel sculpture by Peruvian artist Peruko Ccopacatty, donated for park entry circle by nearby Peck Iron and Metal, where the sculptor created the piece from recycled scrap.
Righting the Balance,” steel sculpture by Peruvian artist,
Peruko Ccopacatty, donated for park entry circle by nearby
Peck Iron and Metal, where the sculptor created the piece from recycled scrap.

Sculpture a symbol of park’s restoration, industrial past

From The Virginian-Pilot, Oct 28, 2013
Janie Bryant

PORTSMOUTH

Sunlight flickers on the stainless steel sculpture that now greets visitors to Paradise Creek Nature Park.

The artwork isn’t typical of a nature park - no eagle or butterfly or other form of wildlife.

It portrays two workers exerting muscle to raise a crane.

Some would say this is more a tribute to the city’s industrial heritage, especially the storied shipyard down the street.

And, in part, they would be right.

But members of the Elizabeth River Project felt it belonged.

This 40-acre creekside woodland has become a symbol of efforts to restore the balance between a thriving industrial harbor and the health of the river that sustains it, according to Marjorie Mayfield Jackson, executive director of the Elizabeth River Project. The park is in an area that has been home to industry since Colonial shipbuilding days. Today, some of those industrial neighbors are among those trying to undo damage. Jackson and another staff member led the way between towering sycamore and maple trees to point out projects and nearby companies.

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Scottish artist Rob Mulholland at the park

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